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WOMEN NEWS

          ROE vs WADE

Making Sure It Stays On The Agenda of All Candidates and The Ballots

Significance of Roe v Wade

Many think of Roe v. Wade as the case that "legalized abortion." However, that isn't exactly true. What it did was change the way states can regulate abortion, and characterized abortion as something that was covered under constitutional rights of privacy.

Roe v. Wade is a 1973 lawsuit that famously led to the Supreme Court making a ruling on abortion rights. Jane Roe, an unmarried pregnant woman, filed suit on behalf of herself and others to challenge Texas abortion laws. A Texas doctor joined Roe's lawsuit, arguing that the state's abortion laws were too vague for doctors to follow. He had previously been arrested for violating the statute.

On June 24, 2022, the U.S. Supreme Court released its decision in Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health, which overturned Roe v. Wade. Wondering what happens now? Our Supreme Court blog has coverage of the practical effects of the court's latest decision on abortion and what the future might hold for legal fights over reproductive rights

Aug 2  Kansas voters on Tuesday rejected an effort to remove abortion protections from the state's constitution, a resounding win for the abortion rights movement in the first statewide electoral test since the U.S. Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade.

READ: https://www.reuters.com/world/us/abortion-rights-face-voter-test-kansas-after-roe-v-wade-reversal-2022-08-02/

READ: https://supreme.findlaw.com/supreme-court-insights/roe-v--wade-case-summary--what-you-need-to-know.html

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Women's Equality Day - National Women's History Alliance

19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution: Women's Right to Vote (1920)

August 26, 2022

Women have registered and voted at higher rates than men

Women's Equality Day is celebrated in the United States on August 26 to commemorate the 1920 adoption of the Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, which prohibits the states and the federal government from denying the right to vote to citizens of the United States on the basis of sex.

Approved by the Senate on June 4, 1919, and ratified in August 1920, the Nineteenth Amendment marked one stage in women's long fight for political equality. The 19th amendment legally guarantees American women the right to vote. Achieving this milestone required a lengthy and difficult struggle—victory took decades of agitation and protest.This timeline features key moments on the Senate's long road to the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment to the Constitution.

How did 19th Amendment change women's lives?

The 19th Amendment helped millions of women move closer to equality in all aspects of American life. Women advocated for job opportunities, fairer wages, education, sex education, and birth control.

What were some effects after the 19th Amendment was added to the Constitution?

The face of the American electorate changed dramatically after the ratification of the 19th Amendment in 1920. Having worked collectively to win the vote, more women than ever were now empowered to pursue a broad range of political interests as voters.

Who was the first woman to fight for women's rights?

Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton, pioneers of the Women's Rights Movement, 1891. Perhaps the most well-known women's rights activist in history, Susan B. Anthony was born on February 15, 1820, to a Quaker family in the northwestern corner of Massachusetts